In case you missed some of the background, several weekends ago on the NXL pro field, Trevor Resar of Infamous collided with a Baltimore Revo player Chris Lloyd who had his goggles knocked loose during a point and received minor injuries to the face. Hopefully Lloyd is well recovered by now and ready for World Cup which lies around the corner.trevor-resar-infamous-paintball This incident has brought the attention of the WPBO to a long time non issue, and will be making last minute rule changes that will most likely effect every player looking to participate in World Cup. In a press release the WPBO wanted to clarify “Clarification on the EC & ASTM Goggle standards

 

Point 5.2.1. of the WPBO Rules says that the goggle systems used by people entering a paintball field, including but not limited to paintball players, staff and referees, must be manufactured for paintball use, in good repair and with undamaged lenses.

These goggles must meet or exceed EC & ASTM Standards. Among other things, the EC & ASTM Standards outline the mandatory use of the chin strap for safety reasons: In order to make this part of the Rules clear for everyone, we remind all the players that using EC & ASTM approved goggles fitted with the manufacturer’s chin strap is mandatory. The photo below is provided by WPBO for clarification of what they mean.
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Some feel this might be just an untimely grab for extra cash for companies going into the end of the year. While others who disagree with that notion feel this is justified do to Trevor’s incident.

 

Nick Schaedal gave us a response and that we should note that these are his personal opinions and do not reflect the views or opinions of any organization he may be associated with.,

“This release can be attributed to two different factors: the recent injury sustained on the pro field due to an impact causing the dislodging of a player’s goggles, and the upcoming and recent releases of new goggle systems by major manufacturers with big stakes in the leagues.

Personally, I believe it’s nonsensical and a typical knee-jerk reaction to a high profile instance of equipment-related injury.

The higher-ups of the leagues are well-aware that the vast majority of players remove their chin straps shortly after purchase, never to be seen again. If they’re not aware, they’re either being willfully ignorant, or blatantly ignore the entirety of the player base.

So in an attempt to either cover their own asses, or squeeze even more money out of the players, they’re making a last-minute rule change that will force players to either buy a new mask, find a means of locating a chin strap that will fit onto their current mask (no easy task for most), or simply not play. Assuming this applies for referees and media as well, this rule change is going to result in lost staff and media coverage and is overall a very poor reactionary decision on behalf of the leagues.”

Chris Henk also shared his opinion, “If this does become Rule of the Tournaments, it would be helpful of the mask manufacturers to sell the chin straps like they sell lenses. By the way, if companies start selling the chin straps at $15 or more, that company deserves to die.